Blog

  1. Just Because You Can’t Find a Place to Park …..

    Parking is a universally hot topic across the board. Perceptions of "not enough parking" by consumers, of "too much and too expensive" by developers ... and the list goes on. A recent public meeting I attended heard a litany of complaints from business owners in a main street environment that there was a shortage of parking. However, a quick...
  2. Walkability Along the Wasatch Front

    On November 19th, the Walkable Neighborhood Conference was held in Provo, UT, with about 80 attendees interested in this timely topic. With burgeoning air quality issues, along with anticipated growth and investments in transit, raising awareness for the benefits of walkability is important. The key note presentation was by Kris Longson, followed by a panel presentation and discussion. Panelists included...
  3. Are There Real Economic & Health Benefits to Compact, Walkable Cities?

    Walking Family This article, by Hazel Borys of Placemakers, is an excellent piece of research that details the costs of sprawl and the benefits of compact development. Clearly, most Americans embrace the opportunity to live and work in cities and neighborhoods that do not require a car for daily necessities. Personally speaking,...
  4. Parking Requirements: Often a Barrier to Development of Downtown Housing

    This is a theme I hear from developers who wish to build downtown housing, and from community leaders who want housing, but have not changed outdated parking regulations. As we look at the maturation of young professionals into families with children, the development of downtown housing with larger units is precluded by current parking regulations. Good post by A-P...
  5. Restaurants Really Can Determine the Fate of Cities …

    This is a great article on the importance of downtown restaurants to economic development (source: The Atlantic, CityLab). Here in Provo, where efforts to revitalize downtown are ongoing, a burgeoning restaurant and music scene is beginning to create synergy. Local restaurants draw residents to a walkable and unique dining experience. Generic chains need not apply. http://www.citylab.com/politics/2014/07/how-food-drives-cities-resurgences/374806/
  6. The Quest to Measure the Brain’s Response to Urban Design

    Sarah GoodyearQuality urban environments lead to historically higher real estate values. Dover & Massengale speak of this in their book, "Street Design." It now appears that technology may deliver a quantifiable method to measure human psychological response to urban environments. This article from Atlantic Cities' Sarah Goodyear, details the latest...
  7. The Essential City Framework – The Evolution of Streets & Blocks

    The following article contains researched scale comparisons of city Main Streets over time. The delight of intimate, pedestrian scaled districts, both in the US and abroad, exemplify the design of streets and blocks before the advent of the gasoline engine. Our "modern" suburban and mega block patterns of development from the 20th century forward, were typically designed by transportation...
  8. Design Streets as the Most Important Public Spaces

    Design Streets As the Most Important Public Spaces - Because They Are This is an excellent article authored by Richard Dagenhart, AIA, AICP, one of the brightest in the field of urban design. Professor Dagenhart teaches architecture and urban design in the School of Architecture at Georgia Institute of Technology. He has been instrumental in affecting change and stimulating...
  9. Planning for American Cities: the Growth Ahead

    Our cities are rapidly changing. The link below is a presentation by Arthur C. (Christian "Chris") Nelson, Ph.D., FAICP. Dr. Nelson is currently the Presidential Professor and Director of the Metropolitan Research Center at the University of Utah, previously with Georgia Institute of Technology. He is renowned as a top authority on planning, urban design and real estate development. Dr....
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